Synthetic Monitoring

Simulate visitor interaction with your site to monitor the end user experience.

View Product Info

FEATURES

Simulate visitor interaction

Identify bottlenecks and speed up your website.

Learn More

Real User Monitoring

Enhance your site performance with data from actual site visitors

View Product Info

FEATURES

Real user insights in real time

Know how your site or web app is performing with real user insights

Learn More

Infrastructure Monitoring Powered by SolarWinds AppOptics

Instant visibility into servers, virtual hosts, and containerized environments

View Infrastructure Monitoring Info

Comprehensive set of turnkey infrastructure integrations

Including dozens of AWS and Azure services, container orchestrations like Docker and Kubernetes, and more 

Learn More

Application Performance Monitoring Powered by SolarWinds AppOptics

Comprehensive, full-stack visibility, and troubleshooting

View Application Performance Monitoring Info

Complete visibility into application issues

Pinpoint the root cause down to a poor-performing line of code

Learn More

Log Management and Analytics Powered by SolarWinds Loggly

Integrated, cost-effective, hosted, and scalable full-stack, multi-source log management

 View Log Management and Analytics Info

Collect, search, and analyze log data

Quickly jump into the relevant logs to accelerate troubleshooting

Learn More

The Developer Obsession With Code Names – 186 Interesting Examples

Code names can be about secrecy, but when it comes to software development, it’s usually not so much about secrecy as it is about the convenience of having a name for a specific version of the software. It can be very practical to have a unique identifier for a project to get everyone on the same page and avoid confusion.

And we want to name our darlings, don’t we?

So what kind of code names are developers out there coming up with? Here is a collection of code names for software products from companies like Google, Microsoft, Apple, Canonical, Red Hat, Adobe, Mozilla, Automattic and more. We tried to give some background information wherever possible. You’ll notice that some code name schemes are definitely more out there than others.

Mozilla Code Names

Mozilla has based most of the code names for different Firefox versions on parks.

An interesting aside is that Mozilla itself was originally the internal code name at Netscape for its Netscape Navigator project.

  • Phoenix – Firefox 1.0
  • Deer Park – Firefox 1.5
  • Bon Echo – Firefox 2
  • Gran Paradiso – Firefox 3
  • Shiretoko – Firefox 3.5
  • Namoroka – Firefox 3.6

Microsoft Code Names

Microsoft has a ton of products, and code names for most of them. When it comes to Windows, Microsoft seems largely obsessed with location names, with a few exceptions.

  • Janus – Windows 3.1
  • Snowball – Windows for Workgroups 3.11
  • Chicago – Windows 95
  • O’Hare – First version of Internet Explorer
  • Memphis – Windows 98
  • Daytona – Windows NT 3.5
  • Cairo – Windows NT 4.0
  • Whistler – Windows XP
  • Longhorn – Windows Vista
  • Vienna – Windows 7
  • Blue – Windows 8.1
  • Threshold – Windows 10 (RTM and 1511)
  • Redstone – Windows 10 (versions 1607, 1703, 1709, 1803 and 1809)

Canonical Code Names

Code names for Ubuntu versions always follow the pattern “adjective + animal”. The first Ubuntu release was called Warty Warthog because it was created in a short period of time and there wasn’t much time for polish. Canonical wanted to keep using “hog” in the version names, but soon abandoned that (after Hoary Hedgehog). If they hadn’t, Breezy Badger would have been code named Grumpy Groundhog.

Note also that as of Breezy Badger, the code names have been in alphabetical order.

  • Warty Warthog – Ubuntu 4.10
  • Hoary Hedgehog – Ubuntu 5.04
  • Breezy Badger – Ubuntu 5.10
  • Dapper Drake – Ubuntu 6.06
  • Edgy Eft – Ubuntu 6.10
  • Feisty Fawn – Ubuntu 7.04
  • Gutsy Gibbon – Ubuntu 7.10
  • Hardy Heron – Ubuntu 8.04
  • Intrepid Ibex – Ubuntu 8.10
  • Jaunty Jackalope – Ubuntu 9.04
  • Karmic Koala – Ubuntu 9.10
  • Lucid Lynx – Ubuntu 10.04
  • Maverick Meerkat – Ubuntu 10.10
  • Natty Narwhal – Ubuntu 11.04
  • Oneiric Ocelot – Ubuntu 11.10
  • Precise Pangolin – Ubuntu 12.04
  • Quantal Quatzal – Ubuntu 12.10
  • Raring Ringtail – Ubuntu 13.04
  • Saucy Salamander – Ubuntu 13.10
  • Trusty Tahr – Ubuntu 14.04
  • Utopic Unicorn – Ubuntu 14.10
  • Vivid Vervet – Ubuntu 15.04
  • Wily Werewolf – Ubuntu 15.10
  • Xenial Xerus – Ubuntu 16.04
  • Yakkety Yak – Ubuntu 16.10
  • Zesty Zapus – Ubuntu 17.04

Apple Code Names

Just like Microsoft, Apple has several products, and code names for basically all of them. We focused on Mac OS. The influences for Apple’s Mac OS code names are pretty obvious. For a while they were mostly musical terms, and as of Mac OS X, the focus switched to big cats.

Fun little anecdote: System 7.5 was code named Mozart, but also Capone. Why Capone? Because like the famous gangster, it was meant to rule over Chicago (Windows 95).

We also have to mention Apple’s code name for A/UX (Apple Unix) 1.0: Pigs in Space.

  • Harmony – Mac OS 7.6
  • Tempo – Mac OS 8.0
  • Bride of Buster – Mac OS 8.1
  • Allegro – Mac OS 8.5
  • Sonata – Mac OS 9
  • Fortissimo – Mac OS 9.1
  • Moonlight – Mac OS 9.2
  • Cheetah – Mac OS X 10.0
  • Puma – Mac OS X 10.1
  • Jaguar – Mac OS X 10.2
  • Panther – Mac OS X 10.3
  • Tiger – Mac OS X 10.4
  • Leopard – Mac OS X 10.5
  • Snow Leopard – Mac OS X 10.6
  • Lion – Mac OS X 10.7
  • Mountain Lion – OS X 10.8
  • Mavericks – OS X 10.9
  • Yosemite – OS X 10.10
  • El Capitan – OS X 10.10

Automattic Code Names

Starting after WordPress 1.0, Automattic has code named most WordPress releases after well-known jazz musicians.

  • Mingus – WordPress 1.2
  • Strayhorn – WordPress 1.5
  • Duke – WordPress 2.0
  • Ella – WordPress 2.1
  • Getz – WordPress 2.2
  • Dexter – WordPress 2.3
  • Brecker – WordPress 2.5
  • Tyner – WordPress 2.6
  • Coltrane – WordPress 2.7
  • Baker – WordPress 2.8
  • Carmen – WordPress 2.9
  • Thelonious – WordPress 3.0
  • Reinhardt – WordPress 3.1
  • Gershwin – WordPress 3.2
  • Sonny – WordPress 3.3
  • Green – WordPress 3.4
  • Elvin – WordPress 3.5
  • Oscar – WordPress 3.6
  • Basie – WordPress 3.7
  • Parker – WordPress 3.8
  • Smith – WordPress 3.9
  • Benny – WordPress 4.0
  • Dinah – WordPress 4.1
  • Powell – WordPress 4.2
  • Billie – WordPress 4.3
  • Clifford – WordPress 4.4
  • Coleman – WordPress 4.5
  • Pepper – WordPress 4.6
  • Vaughan – WordPress 4.7
  • Evans – WordPress 4.8
  • Tipton – WordPress 4.9
  • Bebo – WordPress 5.0
  • Betty – WordPress 5.1

Google Code Names

Someone at Google clearly has a sweet tooth. All Android code names are pastries or desserts. (For those who wonder what FroYo is, it’s short for frozen yogurt.)

  • Cupcake – Android 1.5
  • Donut – Android 1.6
  • Eclair – Android 2.0/2.1
  • FroYo – Android 2.2
  • Gingerbread – The update after FroYo
  • Ice Cream Sandwich – Android 4.0
  • Jelly Bean – Android 4.1-4.3
  • KitKat – Android 4.4
  • Lollipop – Android 5.0-5.1
  • Marshmallow – Android 6.0
  • Nougat – Android 7.0-7.1
  • Oreo – Android 8.0-8.1
  • Pie – Android 9

Adobe Code Names

Adobe’s code names for Photoshop largely seem to be movie related in one form or another, with names of movie characters, movie titles, and other references, some definitely more obscure than others.

  • Fast Eddy – Photoshop 2.0
  • Tiger Mountain – Photoshop 3.0
  • Big Electric Cat – Photoshop 4.0
  • Strange Cargo – Photoshop 5.0
  • Venus in Furs – Photoshop 6.0
  • Liquid Sky – Photoshop 7.0
  • Dark Matter – Photoshop CS
  • Space Monkey – Photoshop CS2
  • Red Pill – Photoshop CS3
  • Stonehenge – Photoshop CS4
  • White Rabbit – Photoshop CS5
  • Superstition – Photoshop CS6
  • Lucky 7 – Photoshop CC
  • Single Malt Whiskey Cat – Photoshop CC 2014
  • Dedicated to Thomas and John Knoll – Photoshop CC 2015 1, 1.2
  • Haiku – Photoshop CC 2015.5, 5.1
  • Big Rig – Photoshop CC 2017
  • White Lion – Photoshop CC 2018
  • B Winston – Photoshop CC 2019

Fedora Code Names

Fedora started off relatively thematic, with the code names for Fedora Core 1 through 5 all being in some way related to alcohol (wine or beer). After that, the relationships between the code names get much less consistent.

Update: Fedora uses a naming scheme where a new release has to have a relationship with the previous release. More info on their guidelines page.

  • Yarrow – Fedora Core 1
  • Tettnang – Fedora Core 2
  • Heidelberg – Fedora Core 3
  • Stentz – Fedora Core 4
  • Bordeaux – Fedora Core 5
  • Zod – Fedora Core 6
  • Moonshine – Fedora 7
  • Werewolf – Fedora 8
  • Sulphur – Fedora 9
  • Cambridge – Fedora 10
  • Leonidas – Fedora 11
  • Constantine – Fedora 12
  • Goddard – Fedora 13
  • Laughlin – Fedora 14
  • Lovelock – Fedora 15
  • Verne – Fedora 16
  • Beefy Miracle – Fedora 17
  • Spherical Cow – Fedora 18
  • Schrödinger’s Cat – Fedora 19
  • Heisenbug – Fedora 20
  • Twenty One – Fedora 21

Red Hat Linux Code Names

The geek presence is strong here. Note for example the (original) Battlestar Galactica reference for RHL 5.2 and 5.9: Apollo and Starbuck. Or it could be a coincidence, because there are many literary and mythical references here. For example, Starbuck is also a character in the novel Moby-Dick, The Sea-Wolf is a Jack London novel, and so on. Fun aside, one RHL version shares its name with a Mozilla product: Thunderbird.

  • Mother’s Day – RHL 1.0
  • Picasso – RHL 3.0.3
  • Colgate – RHL 4.0
  • Vanderbilt – RHL 4.1
  • Biltmore – RHL 4.2
  • Thunderbird – RHL 4.8
  • Mustang – RHL 4.9
  • Hurricane – RHL 5.0
  • Manhattan – RHL 5.1
  • Apollo – RHL 5.2
  • Starbuck – RHL 5.9
  • Hedwig – RHL 6.0
  • Cartman – RHL 6.1
  • Piglet – RHL 6.1.92
  • Zoot – RHL 6.2
  • Guinnes – RHL 7.0
  • Seawolf – RHL 7.1
  • Enigma – RHL 7.2
  • Valhalla – RHL 7.3
  • Psyche – RHL 8.0
  • Shrike – RHL 9
  • Severn – RHL 9.0.93

Debian Code Names

All Debian releases are code named after character names from the film Toy Story. Remember Sid, the emotionally unstable, toy-destroying kid next door? That’s the permanent name for Debian’s unstable development distribution.

  • Buzz – Debian 1.1
  • Rex – Debian 1.2
  • Bo – Debian 1.3
  • Hamm – Debian 2.0
  • Slink – Debian 2.1
  • Potato – Debian 2.2
  • Woody – Debian 3.0
  • Sarge – Debian 3.1
  • Etch – Debian 4.0
  • Lenny – Debian 5.0
  • Squeeze – Debian 6.0
  • Wheezy – Debian 7.0
  • Jessie – Debian 8.0
  • Stretch – Debian 9.0

Final Words (Not in Code)

It’s not just software developers who are fond of code names. You’ll find code names wherever there’s some form of research and development going on. For example, Intel and AMD have code names for their processors, Microsoft has code names for each iteration of Xbox 360, Apple has code names for its various computers, and so on.

What we find interesting is the amount of creativity many put into these code names, often revealing cultural references and other obscure interests of its developers.

Want More?

Can’t get enough geekiness? On the theme of code names, take a look at this super-designed data center, as if taken straight from a 007-movie! Also, be sure to check out this massive collection of early computers.

Note: This article first appeared on this blog back in 2010, and we have slightly touched up the content.

Web Performance of the World’s Top 50 Blogs

By: Rachel Frnka Am I the only one who thinks blogs were in their prime in t [...]

Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp Down for Over Five Hours

Did you unconsciously open Instagram, Facebook, or WhatsApp several times throu [...]

The Pingdom Guide to the Internet

By Rachel Frnka We may be biased, but we think we’ve had some great blogs [...]

end user data
Extend Your APM Capabilities With End-User Data

In the internet-driven economy, businesses rely on applications for different f [...]

Troubleshooting End-User Issues With a DEM Tool

In the last decade, businesses have made massive investments in the digital eco [...]

Monitor your website’s uptime and performance

With Pingdom's website monitoring you are always the first to know when your site is in trouble, and as a result you are making the Internet faster and more reliable. Nice, huh?

START YOUR FREE 30-DAY TRIAL

MONITOR YOUR WEB APPLICATION PERFORMANCE

Gain availability and performance insights with Pingdom – a comprehensive web application performance and digital experience monitoring tool.

START YOUR FREE 30-DAY TRIAL
Start monitoring for free